VENDORS AND PURCHASERS ACT

ARRANGEMENT OF SECTIONS

   1   Short title

   2   Forty years substituted for sixty years as the commencement of title

   3   Rules for regulating obligations and rights of vendors and purchasers

   4   Sales or purchases by trustees

   5   Legal estate of bare trustee shall vest in his personal representative

   6   Protection and priority by legal estate or tacking not allowed

   7   Power of Judge of the Court to deal with objections and requisitions and other questions arising out of contracts for sales of land

 

THE VENDORS AND PURCHASERS ACT

[Date of Commencement: 5th May, 1888]

Cap 406.

1   Short title

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   This Act may be cited as the Vendors and Purchasers Act.

2   Forty years substituted for sixty years as the commencement of title

   In the completion of any contract of sale of land and subject to any stipulation to the contrary in the contract, forty years shall be substituted as the period of commencement of title which a purchaser may require in place of sixty years, the present period of such commencement; nevertheless earlier title than forty years may be required in cases similar to those in which earlier title than sixty years may now be required.

3   Rules for regulating obligations and rights of vendors and purchasers

   In the completion of any such contract and subject to any stipulation to the contrary in the contract, the obligations and rights of vendor and purchaser shall be regulated by the following rules, that is to say-

   (a)   Under a contract to grant or assign a term of years, whether derived or to be derived out of a freehold or leasehold estate, the intended lessee or assign shall not be entitled to call for the title to the freehold.

   (b)   Recitals, statements, and descriptions of facts, matters and parties, contained in deeds, instruments, acts, laws or statutory declarations, twenty years old at the date of the contract, shall, unless and except so far as they shall be proved to be inaccurate, be taken to be sufficient evidence of the truth of such facts, matters and descriptions.

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